Top Real Estate Articles of the Week!

Richard Maize,Investment,Professional,Banker,Philanthropist,businessman,finance,financial,trustworthy,entrepreneur,adviser,sustainable,fund,real estate A lot of changes have occurred this week in finance and real estate! So to keep you up to date here are my top picks for articles of the week! Los Angeles real estate continues to be on the rise, but how long can it last? The Hamptons sees a real estate slow down  The 20 hottest U.S. markets for real estate investing in 2017 Which countries have the highest and lowest taxes on residential real estate? Harry Macklowe on New York real estate There you have it! Be sure to check back next week for more updates! I do the hard work so you don’t have to....
Scammers are Posing as Real Estate Agents to Con Buyers

Scammers are Posing as Real Estate Agents to Con Buyers

Technology has made the real estate search easier than ever, but it has also made it easier for scammers posing as real estate agents to run away with your money. The scam goes like this: you’re looking for a home or are even close to purchasing one and you receive an email from “your” real estate agent asking you to urgently wire a deposit in order to secure the property. A variation on the scam comes in the form of an email from your title company, just a few days before closing, asking you to wire money to a legitimate financial institution. In both cases, there is a scammer on the other end of the email chain. Scammers find their targets by hacking into your actual real estate professionals’ email when they access free public Wi-Fi or mistakenly follow a link to click-bait designed to steal their passwords. Alternatively, hackers can access your email in this manner, too. Then they search the inbox for any emails related to real estate transactions and draft fake but professional-looking emails that contain wiring instructions. These emails may come from your real estate agent, title representative, or attorney. If you do end up wiring the money, you likely will not see it again. To avoid the scam, you should speak with your real estate agent when you first establish your relationship about how and when you might be expected to transfer money. If you receive an email requesting that you wire money, call your real estate agent to verify whether he or she was the actual sender, but be sure to use the...
10 tips that turn “House for Sale” sign to “Sold”

10 tips that turn “House for Sale” sign to “Sold”

There are times when a homeowner can take a casual, steady approach to selling a house — and times when, hot market or cold, that house needs to be sold, and sold now. Homeowners can boost their chances of standing out from the crowd, and can entice prospective buyers, with a mix of tried-and-true tactics and smart moves that tap into current trends. What the homeowner can control: Price it right from the start. This isn’t a time to be emotional. A homeowner needs to make sure he’s not factoring in the love and attention he’s lavished on his home — besides the hard value-added dollars and cents. He doesn’t have time to hang around and lower the price in stages. And he also needs to be cognizant of the market in his area. Starter-home sales, for example, may be stifled by a large local population of millennials already saddled with high student debt (a common challenge: In a 2015 study by American Student Assistance,  more than half of respondents, 55 percent, said their student loan debts affected their ability to purchase a home). Declutter. Depersonalize. Prospective homebuyers need to imagine their family in the space, not the current homeowner’s. So the knickknacks, photos, off-season clothes, the floor lamp in the awkward corner? It all needs to go, and the homeowner should consider renting a storage unit to keep it out of the house until she sells. Make sure every room in the house has a “role.” Empty bedrooms can become home offices; awkward spaces on the second-floor landing can become a reading nook or child’s play space. Again,...
Before You Buy a Home, Do These Things

Before You Buy a Home, Do These Things

Buying a home is one of the biggest and most important financial decisions in life. In order for the experience to be as simple and streamlined as possible, these are the things you should do before closing on your new property. Save money for a 20% down payment and closing costs. While it is possible to purchase a home with no down payment or a down payment of as little as 3% of the total price, the optimal target for saving you money in the long run is to put down 20% at the time of purchase. With 20% down, not only will you borrow less money, making your mortgage significantly smaller, but your interest rate will be lower as well, which will save you thousands over the life of the loan. This is because paying 1/5 of the home’s price upfront tells your lender that you’re financially viable for the responsibility of homeownership. Also remember that closing costs will cost you an additional few thousand dollars, so save accordingly in order to be able to complete your home purchase. Make sure your credit is in order. Unless you will be paying all cash, you will need a mortgage to purchase your home. In order to keep your credit in good order, pay your bills on time, especially rent and credit card bills. It is also recommended that you refrain from making any major purchases or taking out new credit accounts for up to two years before purchasing a home so that your credit score remains high and stable. While the FHA minimum required credit score for financing is...
Why Your Commercial Tenant Capacity Is Crucial

Why Your Commercial Tenant Capacity Is Crucial

Whether you’re looking for a source of revenue to fund your present lifestyle or would like to generate income to save for retirement, commercial real estate offers excellent investment opportunities for significant returns of between 6% and 12% of the purchase price, with some returns going as high as 15%. The nature of commercial property creates sizable economies of scale that simply can’t be matched by its residential counterpart. Even a single, small office tower has more tenant capacity than several multifamily homes, allowing you to generate more income from one commercial property than you would from several residential ones. This is possible because a commercial property’s true value lies in its Net Operating Income (NOI), defined as gross income minus operating expenses. Gross income is generated when tenants pay rental fees for the spaces they lease in your commercial property. Therefore, the more units your property has to rent out, the more tenants you will be able to rent to, and the more tenants you rent to, the more net income you will generate. Based on this structure, it is evident that both tenant capacity and actual tenants are also integral parts of a commercial property’s value. Thus, attracting tenants and making sure their needs are taken care of are essential to your investment’s success. Fortunately, filling a newly purchased commercial property with tenants may not be as daunting as it seems. A notable feature of purchasing commercial property is that existing leases will transfer to the new owner once the purchase is complete. Therefore, if the property that you’re looking to purchase is close to fully leased,...
Top Cities Showing Signs of Commercial Real Estate Revival

Top Cities Showing Signs of Commercial Real Estate Revival

When the real estate market bubble burst in the midst of the economic recession of 2007 and 2008, thousand of businesses were forced to file bankruptcy and commercial real estate development came to a halt. Even larger cities, from the Midwest to South Florida, suffered the effects of an economic crisis and many development projects were put on hold— or never came to fruition. Research published in the Business and Economic Journal outlines how the commercial real estate (CRE) market underwent several significant changes after 2007 after a period of time when developers had overbuilt commercial and residential properties. Their analysis reveals how the value of commercial real estate plummeted and the economic recession left many business owners out of funds to maintain their current property or even explore the idea of expansion. Still, several cities around the United States were able to recover from the economic bust in 2008 and others are showing strong signs of a commercial real estate revival. From Denver to Chicago, several markets across the country are experiencing rapid and steady growth in the commercial real estate sector. Here’s a closer look at top cities in the United States seeing a commercial real estate boom in recent years: Miami, Florida Latin Americans have been investing in properties throughout South Florida for some time but in recent years, we’ve been seeing an influx of more Latin Americans seeking out commercial real estate for their businesses and developing new investment properties to attract other business owners. As reporters have pointed out, currency devaluations in Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela drove many Latin Americans to the United States....